Open daily, 10am–5pm, Free

419 Great King Street Dunedin, New Zealand

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Welcome to OM

Shannah Rhynard Geil CROP

We would like to introduce Shannah, and let our newest team member tell us a little about herself. 

 

What is your new role at Otago Museum?
I am the new Object Conservator.

 

Why did you decide to move to Dunedin and join us at OM?
I was looking for a job that encompassed all my previous experiences in collection care, consultancy, and museum conservation. Acting as conservator for the OM provides me the opportunity to do just that, while contributing to the interpretation of a marvellously diverse collection with the intention to “break down barriers, inspire change and spark creativity.

 

What was your last role?
My last role was as Conservator for the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in the United Kingdom, conserving objects from private clients, local museums, and archaeological units.

 

What do you love about your job?
I love being able to handle and explore archaeological and museum objects while making their stories more accessible.  

 

Which is your favourite gallery and why?
I think I would have to say that the stores are my favorite part of the museum, for obvious reasons. But if I had to choose a gallery, I would say the People of the World Gallery… surprise, surprise!   The gallery has such beautiful objects!

 

If you could make any collection item come to life, what would it be and why?
That is a very difficult question for me, as it is hard to choose just one! D71.8, a stirrup jug found in the People of the World gallery has a critter painted on the jug with its tongue sticking out at the viewer. I just wonder what he knows that I don’t.

 

Anything else you want to share with the OM whānau?
I am very grateful and excited to be here! I look forward to my time with OM in the coming years!

 

 

 

Top Image: Shannah Rhynard-Geil. By Shanaya Allan © Otago Museum.